Philip N. Meyer is Professor of Law at Vermont Law School. He was a trial lawyer and served as Coordinator of the Lawyering Program at NYU School of Law. He is an award-winning writer who received an M.F.A. from The Writers' Workshop at The University of Iowa.

 

Professor Meyer has written extensively on issues of narrative and the law, popular culture and the law, as well as legal writing. His papers are available for free download at ssrn.com and are linked below.

 

When Worlds Collide: Exploring Intersections between Legal Writing and Clinical Pedagogy, Scholarship, and Practice

 

Confessions of a Legal Writing Instructor

 

Making the Narrative Move: Observations Based Upon Reading Gerry Spence's Closing Argument in the Estate of Karen Silkwood v. Kerr-McGee, Inc.

 

'Desperate for Love': Cinematic Influences Upon a Defendant's Closing Argument to a Jury

 

'Desperate for Love II': Further Reflections on the Interpenetration of Legal and Popular Storytelling in Closing Arguments to a Jury in a Complex Criminal Case

 

'Desperate for Love III': Rethinking Closing Arguments at Stories

 

'Fingers Pointing at the Moon': New Perspectives on Teaching Legal Writing and Analysis

 

Why a Jury Trial is More Like a Movie than a Novel

 

The Darkness Visible: Litigation Stories & Lawrence Joseph's Lawyerland

 

Introduction: Will You Please Be Quiet, Please? Lawyers Listening to the Call of Stories

 

Are the Characters in a Death Penalty Brief Like the Characters in a Movie?

 

Using Non-Fiction Films as Visual Texts in the First-Year Criminal Law Course

 

Convicts, Criminals, Prisoners, and Outlaws: A Course in Popular Storytelling

 

Retelling the Darkest Story: Mystery, Suspense, and Detectives in a Brief Written on Behalf of a Condemned Inmate

 

Vignettes from a Narrative Primer

 

When Worlds Collide: Exploring Intersections between Legal Writing and Clinical Pedagogy, Scholarship, and Practice

 

Adaptation: What Post-Conviction Relief Practitioners in Death Penalty Cases Might Learn from Popular Storytellers About Narrative Persuasion

 

'The Pathology of Practice,' A Short Story

 

Criminality, Obsessive Compulstion, and Aesthetic Rage in 'Straight Time'

 

 

Philip N. Meyer